Couchiching Connects: April 2017

In this Issue:

Couch News

President's Message

 

Couch Community News

A Wedding

Alumni in the News

Recommended Reading and Listening

Calling All Readers!


The President's Message
Adam Redish

It is late March as I write this and the weather in this part of Southern Ontario is finally starting to feel spring-like – the sun is shining and in the garden, bulbs are starting to emerge. 

I am pleased to say that the Institute, too, is starting to emerge from its winter hibernation. As part of that, I am excited to announce that later this year, we, in partnership with Lakehead University in Orillia, Ont., will host a conference on mental health and well-being. 

While the details are still being worked out, Lakehead brings a strong focus to the issue from the perspective of students, youth, and young adults, while the Institute is able to bring our experience in creating productive policy-focused dialogue and engagement to the table. Together we have the opportunity to create an important and dynamic conference addressing one of the key public policy issue facing Canada today. 

I am also excited to be working with Lakehead in terms of the opportunity it presents to explore the use of technology and social media to expand the reach and scope of dialogue and to reach out to the broader Orillia and Simcoe county community and our many partners there. 

I am pleased to announce the date of the Institute’s Annual General Meeting: April 26th at 6:00 pm. ScotiaBank has generously agreed to allow us the use of a boardroom for the meeting, which will take place in the Young Room on the 63rd floor at Scotia Tower, 40 King Street West, Toronto. For those who cannot join us in person, the call-in number is 1-866-647-6374 or 416-642-6374 (press 8, PIN 2472).  As part of the AGM, we will review and (presumably) accept the audited financial statements and appoint our auditors. I look forward to providing an update on the work of the Board since our last AGM. Please remember that to vote at the AGM you must be a member of the Institute. See the notice below for additional details. I look forward to seeing many of you at this important meeting.


Couchiching Annual General Meeting

The Couchiching Board of Directors hereby gives notice of the Annual General Meeting of the members of the Couchiching Institute on Public Affairs, which will take place April 26th, 2017 at 6:00 pm ET in the Young Room on the 63rd floor, Scotia Tower, 40 King Street West, Toronto. To call into the meeting, please call 1-866-647-6374 or 416-642-6374 (press 8, PIN 2472).  

Please note that access to the Scotia Tower is restricted after 6:00 p.m. so please arrive before that time. 

The agenda and related support material will be circulated at the meeting to members of the Institute in good standing. 

A member of the Institute includes those who have paid $25 for Students or $75 Regular from August 2106 to the present. Donate now to become a member, demonstrate your commitment to “building Canadian democracy, one great conversation at a time”, and be eligible to share your voice at the AGM.

 

Couchiching Community News

 

A Wedding

Leslie De Muelles, former board member and Gala chair in 2013 and 2014, and Wesley George were married on February 18th in Sudbury. Warmest congratulations!

 

Alumni in the News ...

The Globe and Mail, March 20th: In an article by reporter Ingrid PeritzRichard Pound said: “The hazing of an 18-year-old rookie basketball player at McGill University shows the school needs to reinforce its anti-hazing policies and double down on efforts to stop the practice …” He was a speaker at the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, March 15th: Preston Manning wrote: “When the people of the United Kingdom voted last June on whether or not to exit the European Union, London, the capital city, was surprised by the result. While the vote in London itself was 60 per cent in favour of remaining in the EU, the vote in the country as a whole was 52 per cent in favour of leaving. Why was it that the capital, home of the majority of Britain’s political and media elites and the seat of its parliament, seemed to be so much at variance with what the rest of the country was thinking and feeling about the EU?” The founder of the Manning Centre for Building Democracy was the 2007 recipient of the Couchiching Award for Public Policy Leadership.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, March 14th: Phil Fontaine is quoted in an article by Gloria Galloway entitled: “Ottawa lags on TRC pledges, Sinclair says.” “… there is no doubt Canadians are better informed about Indigenous issues as a result of the work of the TRC, and he believes the response from all levels of government has been encouraging. The call to action he most wants to see realized is the recognition of Indigenous peoples as full partners in Confederation. There is so much unfinished business,” but this would be the absolutely important base on which everything else would flow.” Phil was a speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada” and the recipient of the 2014 Couchiching Award for Public Policy.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, March 13th: Michael Valpy wrote: “On Nov. 9, 2016, the day after the election of Donald Trump as U.S. President, The New York Times posted a video by its media columnist, Jim Rutenberg, in which he declared that political journalism in America is broken.” Michael is a senior fellow at Massey College and a fellow at the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto. He has been involved with the Summer Conference for many years.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, March 1st: Martha Hall Findlay and Trevor McLeod wrote: “The world needs to take serious action to reduce global greenhouse-gas emissions and keep global temperature increases below 2C above pre-industrial levels. We agree on that. But here’s the thing.” The president and CEO of Canada West Foundation, Martha is a past member of the Institute’s Board of Directors. Trevor is the director of the Centre for Natural Resources Policy at the Foundation.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, February 25th: Denise Balkissoon wrote: “It’s easy to forget, but the Earth is a physical thing, a bright blue ecosystem making a little circuit in an enormous dark space. So a country is also physical, a three-dimensional body of water, plants and dirt, with wounds and curves and a distinct, recognizable profile. Canada is an intensely physical country – huge, green, rocky and wet – but I am new to appreciating this. Until fairly recently, I mainly considered a country a set of ideas: you know, rights and freedoms, crime and punishment, allocation of resources and trying to squeeze into the international spotlight. Vistas and vegetation do not come naturally to me, and for a long time I was totally fine with that.” She was a table host at the 2016 Couchiching Gala.

Read more

U of T News, February 25th: Phil Fontaine and Margaret MacMillan are to receive honorary degrees at upcoming convocation ceremonies at the University of Toronto. Phil was a speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada” and the recipient of the 2014 Couchiching Award for Public Policy. Margaret, Warden of St. Antony’s College and a professor of international history at Oxford University, was a speaker at the 2010 Summer Conference, “Watershed Moment or Wasted Opportunity”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, February 24th: Ratna Omidvar and Irene Bloemraad wrote: “We are now witnessing the casualties of new U.S. policies arriving at Canadian borders. More might soon follow as those who lack residence documents face a grim future and the possibility of deportation under the Trump administration.” An independent senator representing Ontario and a distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University’s Global Diversity Exchange, Ratna was a speaker at the 2016 Summer Conference, “The Canada Project:  Identity, Citizenship, and Nationhood in a Changing World”. Irene is a professor sociology at the University of California, Berkley, and senior fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Read more

National Post, February 22nd: Reporter Marie-Danielle Smith wrote: “Veteran politician Preston Manningsays the next Conservative leader must strike a balance between emphasizing party unity and addressing populism bubbling up to the surface of Canadian politics. ”The founder of the Manning Centre for Building Democracy was the 2007 recipient of the Couchiching Award for Public Policy Leadership.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, February 22nd: Glen Hodgson wrote: “A new, more diversified Canadian trade and economic era has begun, and the protectionist attitude of the Trump administration is accelerating the emergence of this era. Canada’s trade with the rest of the world almost doubled over the past decade and China is already Canada’s second-biggest trading partner, even though we haven’t developed a clear and consistent strategy to make it happen. What should be Canada’s game plan in China to maximize the economic benefits to Canadians?” during which transfers grew by 6 per cent annually, Ottawa’s last offer was to increase them by 3.5 per cent a year.” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, February 20th: Preston Manning wrote: “To assume that the underlying public concerns fuelling populist uprisings in Europe, Brexit in Britain and the Trump phenomenon in the United States do not exist in Canada would be a big mistake.” The founder of the Manning Centre for Building Democracy was the 2007 recipient of the Couchiching Award for Public Policy Leadership.

Read more

Maclean’s, February 16th: Jason Markusoff wrote: “A question periodically haunts the minds of Albertans in the age of Rachel Notley’s not-too-popular NDP government: what would Jim do? Jim Prentice, unlike the umpteen Tory premiers who preceded him in the province, lost in 2015. His death in a plane crash last October, just as he was concluding work on a new book, added to the curiosity.” He was a speaker at the 2011 Summer Conference, From the Ground Up: Civic Engagement in Our Time”.

Read  more 

The Globe and Mail, February 11th: William A. MacDonald wrote: “Canada will face some challenges in a Trump America, post-Brexit world. The potential for geopolitical instability and difficulties with a U.S. in political turmoil is considerable. Canada will feel the rise of divisive politics elsewhere and so Canadians need to better understand why its political system has worked so well.” He is a Toronto write who, to spark discussion of the nation’s future, has created, with associate William R.K. Innes, The Canadian Narrative Project at canadiandifference.ca. He was a moderator at the 2016 Summer Conference, “The Canada Project:  Identity, Citizenship, and Nationhood in a Changing World”. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, February 10th: Glen Hodgson wrote: “Canada’s health and finance ministers met prior to Christmas to discuss the next phase of health-funding transfers from the federal government to the provinces. After a decade during which transfers grew by 6 per cent annually, Ottawa’s last offer was to increase them by 3.5 per cent a year.” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”. 

Read more 

Power and Influence, Winter 2017: Margaret MacMillan and Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi will be honored at the 30th Annual Testimonial Dinner & Awards, sponsored by Public Policy Forum on April 20th in Toronto and hosted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Margaret, Warden of St. Antony’s College and a professor of international history at Oxford University, was a speaker at the 2010 Summer Conference, “Watershed Moment or Wasted Opportunity”. Mayor Nenshi was the closing speaker at the 2011 Summer Conference, “From the Ground Up: Civic Engagement in Our Time”. 

Read more 

National Post, February 7th: Reporter Vicki Hall wrote: “Dick Pound can’t help but chuckle over the irony of the complaint recently lodged against him with the International Olympic Committee’s ethics commission.” He was a speaker at the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, February 3rd: Tom Flanagan wrote: “So. Farewell then, electoral reform. We hardly knew ye, but you won’t be missed (except by the Greens and NDP).” Professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary and a former campaign manager for conservative parties, Tom was a speaker at the 2010 Summer Conference, “Watershed Moment or Wasted Opportunity”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 30th: Ratna Omidvar wrote: “People worldwide spent their weekends watching in alarm as the implementation of U.S. President Donald Trump’s immigration orders struck down the hopes and plans of thousands.” An independent senator representing Ontario and a distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University’s Global Diversity Exchange, she was a speaker at the 2016 Summer Conference, “The Canada Project:  Identity, Citizenship, and Nationhood in a Changing World”.

Read more

Montreal Gazette, January 28th: Reporter Stu Cowan wrote: “The game of hockey has changed dramatically since Hall of Fame goalie Ken Dryden was winning six Stanley Cups with the Canadiens between 1971 and 1979. ‘When I was a goalie, the risks were pucks and sticks,’ Dryden said Friday night before the start of a Heads Up on the Concussion Issue public lecture at McGill University. ‘The risks for a goalie now are not pucks and sticks. They are getting run over in the crease.’” Ken was a speaker at the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 26th: Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi wrote: “In announcing the Canada Infrastructure Bank, Ottawa has a historic opportunity to not just address Canada’s massive infrastructure deficit, but also to shape the future of Canada’s powerful financial services industry.” He was the closing speaker at the 2011 Summer Conference, “From the Ground Up: Civic Engagement in Our Time”. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, January 25th: Martha Hall Findlay wrote: “Oh, the irony. Just as we start celebrating Canada’s 150th birthday as a nation, a dangerous precedent threatens, for the future, a hallmark of this country’s past success.” The president and CEO of Canada West Foundation, Martha is a past member of the Institute’s Board of Directors.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 24th: Glen Hodgson wrote: “New U.S. President Donald Trump has promised to do many things to make America great again. Some of these promises have major economic flaws with negative consequences, and his ongoing comments are adding to uncertainty. What are the major risks, and opportunities, for Canada from the Trump economic agenda?” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, January 23rd: Parliamentary reporter Bill Curry wrote that Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi will ask the federal cabinet “to consider Calgary as the home of the government’s promised Canada Infrastructure Bank.” The mayor was the closing speaker at the 2011 Summer Conference, “From the Ground Up: Civic Engagement in Our Time”.

Read more

TVO, January 20th: “The Pioneering Life of Lincoln Alexander”. The late Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario was the 2009 recipient of the Couchiching Award for Public Policy Leadership.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 20th:  Paul Heinbecker wrote: “Can anyone really be this unaware? Incoming U.S. president Donald Trumpseems oblivious to the harm he is doing to international governance, while offering no discernible alternative to it, beyond nationalism and the rule of the jungle – plot lines in a movie we know ends badly. His impulses on foreign affairs seem blind to history and deaf to reason but unfortunately not dumb, at least in the vocal sense.” A former ambassador to the UN, Paul is with the Centre for International Governance Innovation, the Balsillie School and Laurier University in Waterloo. He was a speaker at the 2012 Summer Conference, “The Arab Spring: Implications and Opportunities For Canada”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 20th: Bessma Momani wrote: “One does not want to add to the ‘sky is falling’ predictions that a Donald Trump presidency might usher in, but when it comes to the global economy, there are worrying signs that his administration will bring renewed economic volatility.” Bessma is a professor at the University of Waterloo and the Balsillie School of International Affairs, and a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution. She was a speaker at the 2012 Summer Conference, “The Arab Spring: Implications and Opportunities For Canada”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 17th: Glen Hodgson wrote: “Over the past hundred years, Canada’s economy has evolved through two quite different economic eras, guided by trade policy.” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, January 14th: William A. Macdonald wrote: “The whole world, not just the West, has been increasingly driven by two powerful forces, liberty and science. The either/or forces have steadily overbalanced the both/and capacities for compassion and mutual accommodation. They come from within the West and have moved beyond to the rest of the world. This lack of balance has become the central challenge of the 21st century.” He is a Toronto write who, to spark discussion of the nation’s future, has created, with associate William R.K. Innes, The Canadian Narrative Project at canadiandifference.ca. He was a moderator at the 2016 Summer Conference, “The Canada Project:  Identity, Citizenship, and Nationhood in a Changing World”. 

Read more 

Aaron Paquette Network, January 6th: Aaron Paquette wrote: “I didn’t want to write this. There are enough Joseph Boyden stories and opinions out there already. But here goes…” Aaron was a speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, December 30th: Paul Heinbecker wrote: “Since just before Christmas, when the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 2334 on Israeli settlements, the drama of the fractious personal relationships of Benjamin NetanyahuDonald Trump and Barack Obamahas dominated media coverage. A lot of this commentary is missing the point: The resolution, which passed 14-0-1 (the United States abstained), and its strong objections to Israeli settlement building are more portentous than the transitory political theatre surrounding it.” A former ambassador to the UN, Paul is with the Centre for International Governance Innovation, the Balsillie School and Laurier University in Waterloo. He was a speaker at the 2012 Summer Conference, “2012 Summer Conference, “The Arab Spring: Implications and Opportunities For Canada”.

Read more

Paul Heinbecker was also quoted in an article by Laura Stone entitled “Kerry’s comments put Liberals on spot”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, December 30th: Glen Hodgson wrote: “With the apparent death of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), Canada should be examining other Asia-Pacific trade and investment opportunities. Japan ought to be a top priority, but Canada’s trade and investment relationship is stagnant. After an absence of 25 years, I recently had a chance to return to Japan. I was reminded that it is a large, wealthy, fascinating market with rising per capita incomes, but also structural issues.” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, December 29th: Roberta Jamieson is quoted in an article by Robert Everett-Green entitled “Aboriginal language bill promised, but the whole system needs an overhaul.” The president and CEO of Indspire, Roberta was a speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada”. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, December 27th: Michael Redhead Champagnea speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada”, was featured in a photo accompanying an article by Joe Friesen entitled “Canada’s growing indigenous population reshaping cities across the country”. Michael founded Meet Me At The Bell Tower to bring his North End Community together. 

Read more 

Inside the Games, December 27th: Nick Butler wrote: “Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has given his cautious support to a potential Calgary bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games following a meeting with the city's Mayor Naheed Nenshi.” The mayor was the closing keynote speaker at the 2011 Summer Conference, “From the Ground Up: Civic Engagement in Our Time”. 

Read more

Toronto Star, December 19th: Wenran Jiang wrote: “After breaking decades of U.S. diplomatic protocol by taking a call from President Tsai Ing-wen in Taiwan, Trump now claims his administration may not be “bound by a ‘one China’ policy unless we make a deal with China having to do with other things, including trade.” Wenran, a past member of the Institute’s board of directors, is a political science professor at the University of Alberta and a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Centre International Scholars. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, December 20th: Bessma Momani wrote: “Despite being high-value targets, it is rare for ambassadors to be found in the thick of such cruel and brazen attacks like Monday’s on the Russian ambassador to Turkey. The murder of Andrei Karlov, caught on disturbing video and nearly live-tweeted, was a rare sight beamed across the globe, but Russian-Turkish relations have seen far worse in the past few years and the new bond between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan will survive this.” Bessma is a professor at the University of Waterloo and the Balsillie School of International Affairs, and a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution. She was a speaker at the 2012 Summer Conference, “The Arab Spring: Implications and Opportunities For Canada”. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, December 16th: Glen Hodgson and Danielle Goldfarb wrote: “President-elect Donald Trump’s likely isolationist approach to economic policy offers Canada an opportunity to capitalize by attracting top international talent, capital and ideas. Should the Trump administration close its doors to people and trade, Canada could take actions to counteract this by being open to the world.” Glen, senior fellow at the Conference Board of Canada, was a speaker at the 2009 Summer Conference, “The Global Politics of Food” and the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”. Danielle is director of the Conference Board’s Global Commerce Centre. 

Read more 

The Globe and Mail, December 12th: Preston Manning wrote: “An analogy from the oil patch and an illustration drawn from Western Canadian politics have something to teach us about understanding and responding to upsurges in “populism” – a subject of intense discussion around the world, particularly since the election of Donald Trump.” The founder of the Manning Centre for Building Democracy was the 2007 recipient of the Couchiching Award for Public Policy Leadership. 

Read more 

December 10th: Roberta Jamieson, president and CEO of Indspire, is recognized by the Women’s Executive Network 2016 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award. She was a speaker at the 2013 Summer Conference, “Coming Together: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada”. 

TVO, December 8th: International correspondent Lyse Doucet spoke with Steve Paikin about her illustrious career. She delivered the closing keynote address at the 2012 Summer Conference, “The Arab Spring: Implications and Opportunities For Canada”.

Listen 

Maclean’s, December 8th:  … “the Bank of Canada announced that the first Canadian woman on a banknote will be Viola Desmond, a black Nova Scotia woman who refused to leave the whites-only section of a movie theatre in 1946. Her dignified stand against racism—a decade before Rosa Parks—is a curiously little-known part of Canadian history. Maclean’s spoke to Constance Backhouse, a law professor at the University of Ottawa who has written extensively about Desmond …” Constance is a long-time Summer Conference delegate. 

Read more

The Globe and Mail, December 6th: Roy MacGregor quoted Ken Dryden in an article about Governor-General David Johnson’s “We Can Do Better” conference.” It was held in Rideau Hall’s luxurious ballroom, where the Order of Canada is awarded to those who “desire a better Canada.” The 80 invitees in attendance this particular day – professional hockey and football players, Olympians, medical experts, teachers, coaches and parents, some of whom have lost their children to brain trauma – desire a “safer Canada.” Ken was a speaker at the 2014 Summer Conference, “More than a Game: The Politics and Potential of Sport”.

Read more

The Globe and Mail, November 30th: Martha Hall Findlay and Trevor McLeod wrote: “Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shown Canadians that he is willing to make and defend tough decisions. Approving Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain project in the face of staunch opposition falls squarely in that category.” Martha is the president and CEO of the Canada West Foundation and a long-time member of the Institute’s board of directors. Trevor is the director of the Centre for Natural Resources Policy at the Foundation.

Read more

 

Recommended Reading and Listening

Triple Crown: Winning Canada’s Energy Future, by Jim Prentice with Jean-Sébastien Rioux, Harper-Collins Canada, 339 pages, $32.99. 

For a review by Sean McCarthy, who covers the energy beat for The Globe and Mailhttp://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/book-reviews/jim-prentices-triple-crown-reviewed-a-vision-for-canadas-energy-sector/article34065747/ 

4 Steps to Reimagining Canada by John Ralston SaulReflections of a Siamese Twin: A Fair Country: Telling Truths About Canada; Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine & Robert Baldwin; and The Comeback. Penguin Random House Canada. 

Colour Code: A Podcast about Race in Canada, featuring Hannah Sung and Denise Balkissoon. All 11 episodes are now available online at iTunes.com/Colour Code. Denise was a table host at the 2016 Couchiching Gala. 

The New York Review of Books, December 11th: Margaret MacMillan reviewed The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End by Robert Gerwarth. Illustrated, 446pp. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. $28 US. “’This war is not the end but the beginning of violence,’ the German war hero Ernst Junger wrote in 1928. And many of his contemporaries, including Junger himself, did not shrink from that. A significant minority of Europeans welcomed violence as ennobling, and as a way to degrade their enemies while creating new types of societies. Robert Gerwarth, a professor of modern history at University College Dublin, looks at the turbulent five-or-so years especially in the center of Europe, between 1918, when World War I ended, and 1923, when peace seemed to come to the Middle East. His account is both important and timely, and obliges us to reconsider a period and a battle front that has too often been neglected by historians.” Margaret, Warden of St. Antony’s College and a professor of international history at Oxford University, was a speaker at the 2010 Summer Conference, “Watershed Moment or Wasted Opportunity”. 

Read more

The Harper Factor: Assessing a Prime Minister’s Policy Legacy, edited by Jennifer Ditchburn and Graham Fox, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 320 Pages, 6 x 9, 18 figures, 7 tables. ISBN 9780773548701, October 2016, Formats: Cloth.

Read more

 

Calling all Readers of Couchiching Connects!

Please send personal and professional updates to Sheila Robertson, Editor, Couchiching Connectssheila.robcom@gmail.com

2016 Summer Conference

The Canada Project

Identity, Citizenship, and Nationhood in a Changing World

August 5-7, 2016
The YMCA Geneva Park Conference Centre, Orillia, ON

Read More

Newsletter

Couchiching Connects
April 2017
View Now

Sign Up for our Newsletter!

Join Couchiching

Become a Member and be a part of the Couchiching Institute community!

Become a Member

Get Involved, Volunteer!

Join our events, programs and committees across Canada.

Volunteer

Donate

Donate and support the Couchiching Institute and all of our programs.

Donate Now